Why Veterans Should Consider Tech Careers

If you’re a service member who’s transitioning to civilian life, you’re among hundreds of thousands with various career options to consider. Your military training equips you with the necessary resources needed to succeed in your next phase. Since technology is permeating every aspect of our lives, acquiring skills in this field improves your career prospects.

Why The Tech Industry Provides Top-Notch Employment Opportunities

For the US military to remain the best in the world, it needs constant upgrades to its capabilities. As an active service member, you probably already had advanced tech skills that will come in handy in your new career. Veterans created some of the most successful tech-focused companies in the world. They include FedEx, Walmart, and GoDaddy. Tech giants such as Amazon, Microsoft, Google, General Electric, and Cisco have also pledged to hire more veterans.

Your military training and skills give you an advantage when seeking employment. Chances are you operated advanced machinery or software during active service. These skills are transferable to a civilian work environment. The discipline, rigorous training, problem solving and communication expertise, ingenuity, composure, and teamwork skills gained from the military are also beneficial.

Payment Options For Veterans Taking Tech Courses

You have a variety of options to cover your training costs:

  • The GI Bill

Officially known as The Servicemen’s Readjustment Act, this law helps you transition from active military service to a more laid back civilian life. It also covers your tuition for a variety of training programs, including degree courses. Today the list of approved programs includes tens of coding boot camps. A prime example is Eleven Fifty Academy’s tech-based courses, which equip you with marketable skills in 12 to 14 weeks. They include web development, cybersecurity, coding, and software development solutions.

  • VET TEC Funding

This new initiative specifically funds tech training without exhausting your GI Bill benefits. It’s suitable for boot camps that equip you with coding and associated skills. The partner colleges receive the full amount once you graduate and land a job that’s relevant to your training. This clause motivates them to give you the best education and ensure you land some gainful employment.

  • Edith Nourse Rogers STEM Scholarship

This scholarship is an ideal solution if you’re studying a STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) course but have exhausted your GI Bill benefits. It covers your tuition to the tune of up to $30,000.

There are several more scholarship opportunities for veterans and their families. They include Academic Top Scholars (ATS), America’s Child, AMVETS, Army Scholarship Foundation, and Military Family Scholarships. By reskilling and upskilling, you’ll become an indispensable member of the world of corporate technology.

Valuable Tips for Transitioning Veterans

Readjusting to a civilian lifestyle doesn’t always work smoothly for all veterans. Your new environment might be devoid of the discipline and well-defined structure that’s prevalent in the military. It’s advisable to make some changes to sail smoothly in your new career. For example, tone down on using military-specific jargon and acronyms that might confuse your new colleagues. Other useful tips are:

Taking part in the Transition Assistance Program (TAP): You should attend this three-day workshop within 180 days of discharge or retirement. It gives you valuable insights into picking the right career and strategies for looking for employment. Other than crafting a great resume, you’ll also receive tips on how to pass job interviews.

Focus on transferable skills: Your military training will add immense value to the new corporate setting. The leadership qualities, precise communication, prompt execution of orders, and individual accountability will improve overall productivity and efficiency.

Tap into your network: Chances are most of your colleagues in the military are already pursuing fulfilling tech careers. They can act as valuable references once they realize you have skills that can help their organization.

Attend job fairs: There’s a variety of job fairs targeted towards jobless veterans. They include Hiring Our Heroes, DAV, Recruit Military, and American Legion career events. These fairs provide employment possibilities that you couldn’t identify on your own.

Identify military-friendly employers: Most companies appreciate the sacrifices that military members make to keep the country safe. They’re also eager to benefit from your training. You can also contact headhunters and recruiters who specialize in the military to corporate transitions.

A self-assessment of your tech-based skills will help you outline career objectives and plan your professional future. The Department of Veterans Affairs provides CareerScope. This assessment tool gives you suitable employment options based on your skills and interests. Similar solutions include My Next Move for Veterans and Career OneStop.

 Conclusion

The end of active military service should open new and exciting employment opportunities. Well-trained veterans of all ages will not only have a smooth transition into the tech world but also take active leadership roles in their new organizations. If you commit to your new career with the same energy you dedicated to your military service, you’re bound to reap long-term professional and personal benefits.

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